secretrepublic:

Beautiful Bicycle Monday

secretrepublic:

Beautiful Bicycle Monday

Reblogged from secret republic

biroandclay:

Wayne Burgess - Jaguar Production Studio Chief Designer - Talking about his experiences as a designer, the design process in general, and what is tough about being a car designer

Reblogged from Design on Wheels
The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.

Chinese Proverb (via showslow)

In our #citydata series, we noted that Vancouver is busy answering this call to arms by planting 150,000 new trees through 2020!

(via thisbigcity)

Reblogged from ideas for cities

tedx:

Here lies a dead bike: James Walker at TEDxRVA
When TEDxRVA speaker James Walker moved to Richmond, VA, he noticed an unusual trend — abandoned bike skeletons chained to trees and poles all over the city. As a lover of bicycles and a believer in reuse, he decided to do something about it, and so to draw attention to these “dead” bikes, he began to memorialize them, shrouding frames with black fabric reading, “Here lies a dead bike.”

He recruited friends to help with this new project, which he called Dead Bikes RVA, and soon dead bikes were being honored all over the city. On the project’s website, they laid out Dead Bikes’ mission:

By shrouding these dead bicycles, we show our appreciation and love for bicycles and hope that they’ll get their second life.

Within the city limits you will occasionally find a bicycle, locked to a pole or tree, stripped of its valuable pieces and left to rust. Even without these components, the bicycle still has value and could be saved for a minimal cost.

What does this say about our respect for a machine we spend so much time enjoying? Does the loss of a lock key merit the abandonment of the entire bike?

The intent of this project is to bring a renewed appreciation for bicycle culture and awareness to a community willing to leave their friends behind.

This March, James spoke at TEDxRVA about the project and explained how art can bring awareness to different social issues. From his talk:

You know how you get someone to notice something in an environment? It’s through disruption … you want to change their expected sight or behavior, and they’ll pay attention for a second…

There’s a lot of big problems in the world worth solving, but there’s a lot of small problems you can solve with kind of some strange ideas…

What [Dead Bikes] is about is, ‘What aren’t you noticing in your community or neighborhood because you’ve been there so long,’ and, ‘What would you do with something if you noticed it?’

Since its start, the project has expanded, with James and friends creating a QR Code-marked bike path based on the locations of found dead bikes in Richmond. “Now cyclists have a path to follow to become involved and a new reason to ride their bikes,” says the Dead Bikes website. “As more submissions are received, the path will continue to grow.”

For more on Dead Bikes, watch James’s entire TEDxRVA talk here, or visit the Dead Bikes website.

(Photos via Dead Bikes)

Reblogged from TEDx
Africa’s tech scene is surging. Across the continent, new hubs, labs and co-working environments are giving rise to oases of innovation.
— Adam Oxford on Africa’s tech scene. (via thisbigcity)
Reblogged from ideas for cities

drivenetwork:

Are Hybrid Hypercars The Apex Of Road-Car Tech? — AFTER/DRIVE

Reblogged from /DRIVE Network
thisbigcity:

thenewurbanist:

New Suburbanism: Reinventing Inner-ring Suburbs
by D. Jamie Rusin, Ryan Call and Sean Slater
As inner-ring suburbs in the United States become denser, demand for access to nearby walkable urban environments is rising. Residents are looking for shorter driving distances to commercial, cultural, leisure, and work opportunities. Municipalities are also interested in promoting compact development near transit. As a result, the next big wave of development will focus on creating nodes of mixed-use infill projects in these suburbs…

One of the next great spatial focuses for US redevelopment and infill: inner ring suburbs.

thisbigcity:

thenewurbanist:

New Suburbanism: Reinventing Inner-ring Suburbs

by D. Jamie RusinRyan Call and Sean Slater

As inner-ring suburbs in the United States become denser, demand for access to nearby walkable urban environments is rising. Residents are looking for shorter driving distances to commercial, cultural, leisure, and work opportunities. Municipalities are also interested in promoting compact development near transit. As a result, the next big wave of development will focus on creating nodes of mixed-use infill projects in these suburbs…

One of the next great spatial focuses for US redevelopment and infill: inner ring suburbs.

Reblogged from ideas for cities

There seems to be a notion (at least) of a cutoff point in life, whereas if you haven’t found out what you want to be doing, or who you are, than it’s too late and you’re too old to try and define yourself…which is nonsense, obviously.

But nonetheless, it was a notion that was with me, and I really started to panic … that I wouldn’t figure out what it was I wanted to do for the next 75 years, or whatever I had got left…

But then it did suddenly hit me that maybe I could be an illustrator. And when I said that, when I said, ‘I am an illustrator,’ it seemed to fit. So I set myself a challenge. I would draw a drawing a day, every day, for a year. I woke up an hour early and just drew — while I was still waking up…

People asked me during the project, ‘How do you find the time to do this?’ … ‘How do you find the time to do what you love?’ … And these are usually the same people that tell me that they’ve just watched a box set of Lost over an evening or they’ve watched some videos of cats playing pianos on YouTube for five hours a night.

You find time. If you’re passionate about something and if you’ve got a goal then you find time — and in many cases you have to almost kind of create time.

From illustrator David Litchfield’s TEDxBedford talk, “What a drawing a day taught me,” which you can watch here.
(via tedx)
Reblogged from TEDx
Every time a journalist is killed by extremists, drug cartels or even government forces, there is one less voice to speak on behalf of the victims of conflict, crime and human rights abuses.
— Deputy secretary-general Jan Eliasson of the UN Security Council. The council held an open debate among delegates and journalists following a campaign by A Day Without News?, the Committee to Protect Journalists and Reporters Sans Frontiers. Read more on the journalism.co.uk Web site. (via reportagebygettyimages)
Reblogged from